Dave Gibson

David Gibson - Roadside notes along Cascade Lake
© 2011 Ken Rimany

Adirondack Almanack  is a daily web-based digest of Adirondack politics, history, culture and environment. Editor John Warren has earned plaudits and awards for his efforts since 2005. In 2010, John earned the Adirondack Mountain Club's Communicator of the Year award. John recruits a wide variety of writers who are posted daily on the site. From natural history, to regional history, the arts, philosophy, wilderness, public policy, political coverage and commentary and more, you can find all this and more on the Almanack.

Adirondack Wild's David Gibson is one of three dozen or so writers who contribute commentary monthly or twice monthly.  Gibson’s posts interweave environment, wilderness, and the Adirondack Park. The website also contains a valuable daily digest of Adirondack-related headlines and news gleaned from multiple regional media, and a weekly summary of Adirondack outdoor conditions. The site claims 6000 daily email or RSS subscribers, and of course many more who enter the website.

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ADIRONDACK ALMANACK - Writings by Dave Gibson, 2013

Post 80, December 16 — Classification Deal Will Require Rule Changes

For three days, the Adirondack Park Agency deliberated on a set of classifications for Forest Preserve in Newcomb, Minerva and Indian Lake that were never in doubt. The decisions were the Governor’s. APA took its direction from him, as it did with the Adirondack Club and Resort two years ago. read PDF>


Post 79, November 25 — Whiteface Memorial Highway and the
Forest Preserve

The late, extraordinary forest educator, Dr. Edwin H. Ketchledge, started an exhibit of native Adirondack trees at the base of the Whiteface Memorial Highway in Wilmington, and wrote to all who would listen how important it would be to properly interpret the natural history of the mountain from the base of the road to the mountain’s summit. Of course, Dr. Ketchledge had interpreted this route in hundreds of ways during his career as a teacher, and was hopeful that his legacy would continue. read PDF>


Post 78, November 3 — Vote Yes on Prop 4

Perhaps I first heard of the Township 40 disputed land titles during the Adirondack Park Centennial year, 1992. It was probably that fall during a Raquette Lake cruise on the WW Durant with Capt. Dean Pohl. I recalled the issues when canoeing on the lake later that decade. My friend Dan and I paddled Raquette Lake, took the Marion River Carry en route through the Eckford Chain of Lakes. I was back paddling on Raquette Lake through some high winds and waves when our mentor Paul Schaefer died in July, 1996. read PDF>


Post 77, October 16 — Land Sought For Mining Company Is Hardly Ordinary

Bill Ingersoll’s recent post about the November 5 vote on the NYCO Minerals-State Land Exchange (Proposition 5 on the upcoming ballot) makes good reading – as do the comments.

His interpretation, that the land exchange stripped-down to its essence represents a straight commercial transaction that lacks any public need or benefit, is one Adirondack Wild shares, but Bill made an especially articulate case. read PDF>

Post 76, October 14 — Gary Randorf - Strong Link in an Historic Chain

I don’t recall ever crying before at an annual meeting. I am pleased to catch up with people, I am excited to see members and friends gathered together in one place in support of our Adirondack and wild mission. I am proud of the efforts of my colleagues and our members as we talk about our accomplishments together over the past year, and anticipate the challenges in front of us. read PDF>


Post 75, October 01 — Conservation Development in the Park: The Default Option

“Let us develop as if human beings were planning to be around and live on this land for a while longer,” said Randall Arendt, the noted landscape planner and designer and author of numerous books about how to develop the land without ruining its natural, ecologically functional, aesthetic and economic values as open space, books such as Rural By Design. Arendt was one of the keynote speakers at the Adirondack Explorer’s one-day conference last week, Strengthening the APA (NYS Adirondack Park Agency). read PDF>


Post 74, September 10 — A Founding Moment of the Adirondack Park: The 1894 Constitutional Convention

1894 had been a hot summer. 119 years ago this week the most important question before the Constitutional Convention of 1894 came to a head. What, if any, amendments to the State Constitution should be adopted for the preservation of the State forests? read PDF>


Post 73, August 13 — Protection, Preservation of New State Lands Paramount

When the Adirondack Park Agency was reviewing the Adirondack Club and Resort in 2011, board member Richard Booth encouraged APA staff to put all of the most important legal and other considerations from the hearing record on the table early in the review process. read PDF>


Post 72, July 30 — The Economic Value of Protected Land

The Catskill Park and Forest Preserve may be smaller in size than our Adirondack Park but, like Avis in relation to Hertz, Catskill residents may feel the need to try harder. read PDF>


Post 71, July 15 —The Indian River Tract: Lost and Found

New Yorkers have recently come into ownership of nine more miles of the Upper Hudson River and adjoining lakes and tributaries to the west amounting to about 20,000 acres. In addition to the incredible ecological variety and richness, the public has also gained new, strategic points from which canoeists and rafters can exit the river before the truly big rapids begin at Cedar Ledges below the confluence with the Indian River. read PDF>


Post 70, June 20 — Fighting for a Wild Upper Hudson, 1968-2013

This week’s Adirondack Park Agency public hearings in Minerva and Newcomb about the classification of new Forest Preserve land along the Upper Hudson River, Essex Chain of Lakes, Cedar and Indian Rivers were well attended and informative. At Minerva Central School, there was no applause, no heckling. Folks listened to differing viewpoints respectfully, and several speakers noted a fair amount of common interests.read PDF>


Post 69, June 11 — Will Andrew Cuomo’s APA Picks Protect Natural Resources?

By the end of this month, I believe six of the eight citizen members of the Adirondack Park Agency (those gubernatorial nominees who by law cannot be officers or employees of a state agency) will be serving expired, four-year terms. read PDF>


Post 68, May 27 — Big Tupper Resort Amphibian Study: Science After The Fact

While it has not attracted much attention yet, Preserve Associates has hired some biologists to conduct an amphibian study this spring to determine the presence of amphibians on some, but by no means all, of the lands proposed for subdivision and development at the permitted Adirondack Club and Resort (ACR) site in Tupper Lake. read PDF>


Post 67, May 01 —The APA Says Science Can Wait

It’s happened again. The Adirondack Park Agency (APA) has eliminated a permit condition for advance studies to assure no harm comes to sensitive wildlife from new development on four mountain summits. read PDF>


Post 66, April 14 — Where Veterans Stand:
Paul Schaefer and the Pack Forest

Paul Schaefer took this photo in the Pack Forest in Warrensburg sometime in the 1940s or 50s when he was fighting elsewhere in the Adirondacks to save ancient groves from dam builders.

At Pack Forest Paul told us he took one of his best and luckiest shots. Wanting to capture the public’s imagination with something as ancient and compelling as a 500 year old stand of white pine, Paul was at a loss with the scale and the difficult angle and the lighting until the clouds parted for an instant and sun suddenly shot through the forest canopy. read PDF>


Post 65, April 2 — We Should Protect Vulnerable Vernal Pools

Wander into a wood with your ears open in early spring  and you are likely to quizzically turn your head to try and locate an indistinct sound, far off but not too far off, remarkable but subtle, an undertone of  – castanets? That’s how we described the sound 29 years ago when as new homeowners we explored our forest and discovered the breeding quacks of the wood frog. read PDF>


Post 64, March 18 — Benefits of Conservation Development

Congratulations are due the Adirondack Park Agency and Wildlife Conservation Society’s Adirondack Program for this month’s Adirondack Park Agency (APA) presentation on the benefits of Conservation Development in the western United States. read PDF>


Post 63, March 4 — The Carbon Impacts of Forest Conversion

A few years ago, a Planning Board Member in Clifton Park, Saratoga County posed a question I have never heard asked by anyone at the Adirondack Park Agency : how much carbon dioxide will be released by this subdivision, and what can we do about it? read PDF>


Post 62, February 19 — General Permit Fails to Address Today’s Forest Challenges

There has been some good writing on forestry issues in the Adirondack Park in the media recently, stimulated by the APA’s proposed, controversial General Permit for clear-cut logging. Adirondack Wild applauds the discussion and encourages more of it. read PDF>


Post 61, January 30 — Essex Chain of Lakes and the State Land Master Plan

The Department of Environmental Conservation has recommended that the new Forest Preserve acquisition at the Essex Chain of Lakes be classified Wild Forest, while the Upper Hudson River just to the east become part of a river corridor Wilderness. Several organizations previously submitted ideas for how these landscapes should be classified. read PDF>


Post 60, January 17 — Arthur Savage: An Adirondack Conservation Champion

Arthur V. Savage of Elizabethtown, Keene, and points south died on December 26 and belongs in my pantheon of Adirondack conservation champions. Judging from the flow of email following his death, that also holds true for many others. He was a man of varied interests, commitments, and for all seasons. read PDF>


Post 60, January 03 — New Snowmobile Trail Cut Through Forest Preserve

Late December snow makes it likely that a good base will develop for snowmobiling throughout this winter. A new 13-mile snowmobile (and hiking, possibly biking) trail has been established, a so-called community connector trail between the Moose River Plains Road (Limekiln-Cedar River Road) and Raquette Lake. read PDF>

 

 

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The mission of Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve is to advance New York’s ‘Forever Wild’ legacy and Forest Preserve policies in the Adirondack and Catskill Parks, and promote public and private land stewardship that is consistent with wild land values through education, advocacy and research.

Top left, Autumn © Ken Rimany; Maple Leaves and Lichen ©Ken Rimany

ADIRONDACK PARK REGIONAL
Peter Brinkley, Honorary Chair
pbrinkley@frontiernet.net
Daniel R. Plumley, Partner
dplumley@adirondackwild.org
Home Office: 518.576.9277
David H. Gibson, Partner
dgibson@adirondackwild.org
Mobile: 518.469.4081
Kenneth J. Rimany, Partner
krimany@adirondackwild.org

Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve    Founded 1945   PO Box 9247 • Niskayuna New York 12309 | ©