Dave Gibson

David Gibson - Roadside notes along Cascade Lake
© 2011 Ken Rimany

Adirondack Almanack  is a daily web-based digest of Adirondack politics, history, culture and environment. Editor John Warren has earned plaudits and awards for his efforts since 2005. In 2010, John earned the Adirondack Mountain Club's Communicator of the Year award. John recruits a wide variety of writers who are posted daily on the site. From natural history, to regional history, the arts, philosophy, wilderness, public policy, political coverage and commentary and more, you can find all this and more on the Almanack.

Adirondack Wild's David Gibson is one of three dozen or so writers who contribute commentary monthly or twice monthly.  Gibson’s posts interweave environment, wilderness, and the Adirondack Park. The website also contains a valuable daily digest of Adirondack-related headlines and news gleaned from multiple regional media, and a weekly summary of Adirondack outdoor conditions. The site claims 6000 daily email or RSS subscribers, and of course many more who enter the website.

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ADIRONDACK ALMANACK - Writings by Dave Gibson, 2016

Post 139, Dec 07 — Boreas Ponds Alternative 1 Shouldn't Be There

Alternatives analysis is at the very heart of the State Environmental Quality Review Act. A state or local government agency cannot claim to have rationally chosen a preferred alternative course of action if other alternative approaches to achieve the same project with fewer environmental impacts have not been evaluated with the same degree of rigor and detail. That’s the law. read PDF >


Post 138, Nov 21 — On The Boreas Ponds Northville Hearing

At the Northville Central School public hearing this past week, about 60 citizens lined up to speak their minds regarding the Adirondack Park Agency’s 2016 – 2017 Amendments to the Adirondack Park State Land Master Plan. These amendments involve the Classification and Reclassification of 54,418 acres of State Lands (Forest Preserve) in the Adirondack Park which include the Boreas Ponds Tract, 32 Additional Classification Proposals, 13 Reclassification Proposals, and 56 Classifications involving map corrections. read PDF >


Post 137, Oct 04 — The High Peaks Wilderness: This Resource is Limited

In the recent news and comments about ongoing crowding in the High Peaks there are few references to the document which ostensibly is guiding the state’s management actions there: the 1999 Highs Wilderness Complex Unit Management Plan, or UMP. That management plan is downloadable from the DEC website, www.dec.ny.gov. read PDF >


Post 136, Sep 13 — To Cataract Mountain

Paul Schaefer, our founder and mentor, was born on this day, September 13, 108 years ago.
So I decided to celebrate his birthday by climbing his favorite mountain. It is untrailed and fabulously lonely save for friends Raven spiraling over its peak, Chicadee and Golden Crowned Kinglet finding food among the thick young balsam growing vigorously at its summit. Views from there include Crane Mountain and lower peak upon peak in the Wilcox Lake Wild Forest. read PDF >


Post 135, Aug 23 — The Developer Must Account for his own Approval Delay Costs

One who participated or sat through the Adirondack Club and Resort adjudicatory public hearing in 2011 is hard pressed not to read with interest the recent articles about the status of ACR in the Adirondack Daily Enterprise. The articles appeared in the August 11-12, 2016 editions. read PDF >


Post 134, June 28 — 2016 Legislative Impact on the Adirondacks

The Daily Gazette in Schenectady opined recently that the latest post-budget legislative session in Albany was an essentially useless, squandered opportunity that didn’t accomplish much of importance to New Yorkers. In many areas, it may be true – much more could have been accomplished. Selectively speaking though, there were some accomplishments and compromises which took significant leadership.
read PDF >


Post 133, June 8 — The State Forest Preserve’s Camp Gabriels

Legislation in the form of a constitutional amendment has been introduced in Albany this session which would “convey certain Forest Preserve that was never intended to be included in the Forest Preserve.”  That land is the 92-acre former Camp Gabriels prison in the Town of Brighton, formerly part of Paul Smith’s College, and before that a tubercular sanitarium. How this property and those interested in its conversion from a prison to another use came to this stage is a bit of a long story.
read PDF >


Post 132, June 6 — Birding In The Rain On Hadley Mountain

Sunday’s Bird Walk at Hadley Mountain (a part of our Adirondack Forest Preserve near the Warren-Saratoga County line) was a wash-out. Linda Champagne, intrepid newsletter editor for the Hadley Firetower Committee, was the exception. As we walked up the trail a ways, the drumbeat of rain on our heads slowed, and the migratory birds breeding and raising young here could not help themselves.
read PDF >


Post 131, May 15 — DEC’s Essex Chain Double Standards

DEC Acting Commissioner Basil Seggos signed the Essex Chain of Lakes Primitive Area Unit Management Plan (UMP) in late March, and issued a Findings Statement required by law.
read PDF >


Post 130, May 04 — Planting Trees Along The Hudson With YENN, Adirondack Wild, and Forest Rangers

“I never thought I’d be getting my hands dirty and planting trees in such a big forest,” said Jody last Saturday.

She had joined others from the Youth Ed-Venture and Nature Network, Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve, and NYS Department of Environmental Conservation for a day of hard work along the Hudson River.  YENN volunteers from tye Capital District met me at the Adirondack Mountain Club Headquarters off of Northway Exit 21 (thanks to Danielle for hosting us).  After a brief orientation to the Adirondack Park, we drove to Luzerne and then up River Road into the Town of Warrensburg.
. read PDF >


Post 129, Apr 17 — On the Boreas Ponds Acquisition

My first reaction to the announcement of the state’s acquisition of magnificent Boreas Ponds for the Forest Preserve is to celebrate, and to recall how long the Adirondack Nature Conservancy has owned this 21,000 acre tract – the last of the big Finch Pruyn tracts which the state committed to purchase. . read PDF >


Post 128, Mar 28 — The Effort To Mechanize Wilderness Is Local And National

The fight to embrace wilderness and to keep designated wilderness areas free from mechanized uses is a national fight. APA weakened the Adirondack Park State Land Master Plan this month by carving out two exceptions in its Primitive Area guidelines for bicycling and motorized maintenance in the Essex Chain and Pine Lake Primitive Areas. read PDF >


Post 127, Mar 13 — APA Weakened State Land Master Plan

It was a riveting 90 minutes at the APA this week. In those 90 minutes, the NYS Adirondack Park Agency amended the State Land Master Plan. In doing so, the agency contradicted and violated basic definitions and guidelines that have been protective of wilderness values since 1972. read PDF >


Post 126, Feb 17 — Wetlands Politics: Justice Scalia's Transitory Puddles

I feel a connection with the late Justice Antonin Scalia, albeit indirect. He had strengths, but an environmental and land ethic, because they were not enshrined in the U.S. Constitution, seemed irrelevant to the Justice. Just before he died, he joined the majority in putting a stay on the the Environmental Protection Agency’s clean power regulation and thus called into question American climate commitments made in Paris. But my story is local, not global. read PDF >


Post 125, Feb 08 — APA’s Response To Rail-Trail Comments Falls Short

By this stage the NYS APA, DEC, and DOT may feel justified that they have adequately addressed public comments about the future of the Remsen-Lake Placid Railroad Travel Corridor. Having hosted listening sessions in 2013-14 and several public comment periods in 2015, the last one concluding in December, the DEC’s unit management plan amendment goes on, page after page, responding to questions and comment. The DEC responses justify the preferred alternative of separate corridor segments; segment one with rail from Remsen terminating at Tupper Lake, the other, an all-recreational segment two between Tupper Lake and Lake Placid, without rail. read PDF >


Post 124, Jan 24 — What Should Guide APA Nominations?

Recently someone asked me about how I was following through on Adirondack Wild’s 2015 report Adirondack Park at a Crossroad: A Road Map for Action. When I launched into some of the report’s recommendations for legislative and policy changes, they focused on that portion of the report dealing with appointments to the Adirondack Park Agency. read PDF >


Post 123, Jan 04 — An Historic Defeat For Forest Preserve Exploiters

During his years as a senior advisor to many younger Adirondack conservationists, Paul Schaefer told some interesting stories. He witnessed the following incident in the New York State Legislature in 1953, when he was about 45-years-old, at the height of his effectiveness as a conservation organizer. The following story is about passage of what was called the Ostrander Amendment, an amendment to Article 14, Section 1 – the “forever wild clause” – of the New York State Constitution. read PDF >


 

 

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The mission of Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve is to advance New York’s ‘Forever Wild’ legacy and Forest Preserve policies in the Adirondack and Catskill Parks, and promote public and private land stewardship that is consistent with wild land values through education, advocacy and research.

Top left, Autumn © Ken Rimany; Maple Leaves and Lichen ©Ken Rimany

ADIRONDACK PARK REGIONAL
Peter Brinkley, Honorary Chair
pbrinkley@frontiernet.net
Daniel R. Plumley, Partner
dplumley@adirondackwild.org
Home Office: 518.576.9277
David H. Gibson, Partner
dgibson@adirondackwild.org
Mobile: 518.469.4081
Kenneth J. Rimany, Partner
krimany@adirondackwild.org

Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve    Founded 1945   PO Box 9247 • Niskayuna New York 12309 | ©